Baykeeper Updates Related to Urban Storm Water

Blog Post: January 11, 2011
If you're a resident of San Francisco, check out this special SFPUC program to help you reduce water consumption and storm water pollution to the Bay by installing a rainwater harvesting system. SFPUC is offering discounted rain barrels and cisterns for residents, businesses and schools, and for...
Blog Post: December 14, 2010
With the arrival of the rainy season, the Baykeeper staff has been busy collecting samples of storm water to test for pollution. And we need volunteers who can help! During the rainy season, pollutants from streets, homes, parking lots, commercial centers and industrial sites all get washed into...
Blog Post: December 1, 2009
In October 2009 the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board adopted the final Municipal Regional Stormwater Permit, pursuant to the Clean Water Act. Also known as an MS4 permit, this document describes the requirements cities are required to follow in regards to stormwater and...
Monthly Column: February 1, 2009
San Francisco Baykeeper has worked for almost two decades to protect the San Francisco Bay from pollution. Over the years, we’ve achieved a number of victories that have helped improve water quality not only locally but at the state and national level as well – in fact, last month we secured...
Monthly Column: January 1, 2009
While the rainy season in the Bay Area can mean an end to nice weather and much-loved outdoor activities, it’s an important and productive time for our environment – rain prompts new plant growth after many dry months and replenishes water reserves for drinking and irrigation. In urban areas...
Monthly Column: July 1, 2008
Welcome to summer in the Bay Area: the fog is rolling, the Bay is crowded with windsurfers, swimmers and sailors, visitors fill tour boats and residents are flocking to shoreline parks and beaches for picnics and playtime. Summertime gives us all a chance enjoy recreation on or near the Bay...
Monthly Column: April 1, 2008
Bay Area storm drains tie into our creeks and empty into the Bay without any treatment or filtering. So when it rains, the cigarette butts, automotive fluids, pet waste, household gardening chemicals, and trash accumulated in gutters is washed into local creeks and the Bay. In fact, polluted...

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