Baykeeper Updates Related to Science

Blog Post: August 6, 2018
Do you know what Bay animal resembles both an eagle and a trash compactor? Bat rays are best known for their wide, bat-like “wings” (actually pectoral fins) that make them elegant swimmers. They’re a kind of eagle ray, and they’ll sometimes even pop up to the water’s surface to coast in the air....
Monthly Column: February 1, 2018
Compared to some of our wild neighbors around the Bay Area, we’re all newbies to California.  Sturgeon have swum in our local waters for more than 2 million years. These giant fish can grow even larger than San Francisco Bay’s biggest mammal, the sea lion. But because sturgeon stay far underwater...
Monthly Column: July 6, 2017
For more than three months, hundreds of dead leopard sharks have been washing up on San Francisco Bay’s shoreline. Shark experts investigating the mysterious deaths have made progress, but they haven’t yet determined the exact cause. If you see a shark stranded on the shoreline, don’t try to push...
Blog Post: June 21, 2017
For more than three months, hundreds of dead leopard sharks have been washing up on San Francisco Bay’s shoreline. Shark experts investigating the mysterious deaths have made progress, but they haven’t yet determined the exact cause. If you see a shark stranded on the shoreline, don’t try to push...
Blog Post: September 16, 2015
The Pulse of the Bay report, just published by the San Francisco Estuary Institute, summarizes the present state of Bay water quality and looks ahead to the possible condition of the Bay 50 years from now. The report documents the levels of pollutants found in the Bay, and examines whether the Bay’...
Blog Post: November 2, 2012
Some noteworthy research findings about water quality in San Francisco Bay have recently been released in an annual publication by local scientists and regulators. Here are some highlights: Perfluorinated chemicals, which are used to make non-stick cookware such as Teflon and in stain-resistant...
Blog Post: December 14, 2010
With the arrival of the rainy season, the Baykeeper staff has been busy collecting samples of storm water to test for pollution. And we need volunteers who can help! During the rainy season, pollutants from streets, homes, parking lots, commercial centers and industrial sites all get washed into...