Baykeeper Updates Related to Wildlife & Habitat

Monthly Column: March 5, 2014
Drought’s impact on San Francisco Bay is varied, but fish get hit the hardest. Salmon and steelhead swim into the Bay from the ocean, then swim up rivers or creeks to spawn, depositing the eggs that become the next fish generation. Historically, despite periodic droughts, during spawning season the...
Featured Stories: February 7, 2014
If you’re on the San Francisco Bay shoreline and spot a small, round owl on the ground, it’s probably a burrowing owl. These long-legged birds weigh just 4 to 9 ounces, and are the only owl active on the ground during the day. They have brown spotted feathers and bright yellow eyes. The most likely...
Monthly Column: February 3, 2014
If you’re on the San Francisco Bay shoreline and spot a small, round owl on the ground, it’s probably a burrowing owl. These long-legged birds weigh just 4 to 9 ounces, and are the only owl active on the ground during the day. They have brown spotted feathers and bright yellow eyes. The most likely...
Featured Stories: December 16, 2013
Dungeness crabs are a Bay Area holiday tradition. But long before these tasty crustaceans grace our dinner plates, they’ve made an amazing journey. They start in the Pacific Ocean, migrate at least 20 miles to San Pablo Bay, and later walk back along the San Francisco Bay bottom all the way out the...
Monthly Column: December 2, 2013
Dungeness crabs are a Bay Area holiday tradition. But long before these tasty crustaceans grace our dinner plates, they’ve made an amazing journey. They start in the Pacific Ocean, migrate at least 20 miles to San Pablo Bay, and later walk back along the bottom of the San Francisco Bay all the way...
Featured Stories: October 9, 2013
On autumn nights, flocks of Western Grebes end their migration by alighting on San Francisco Bay, their seasonal home. These strikingly beautiful birds are about two and half feet long, black on top with white undersides. They have yellow beaks, bright red eyes, and long, swanlike necks. Migrating...
Monthly Column: October 1, 2013
On autumn nights, flocks of western grebes end their migration by alighting on San Francisco Bay, their seasonal home. These strikingly beautiful birds are about two and half feet long, black on top with white undersides. They have yellow beaks, bright red eyes, and long, swanlike necks. Migrating...
Monthly Column: August 1, 2013
Have you walked along the shores of San Francisco Bay and spotted a dark head in the water, with big eyes looking back at you? From the safety of water, a harbor seal will often curiously watch people walking on the beach. Harbor seals can also playfully bump swimmers, although they have been known...
BK In The News: February 4, 2013
The United States has named the San Francisco Bay and Estuary as its 35th Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention, effective on World Wetlands Day, February 2. Deb Self, executive director of the nonprofit San Francisco Baykeeper, said of the designation, “It’s terrific news...
Monthly Column: May 9, 2012
Are gray whales coming into San Francisco Bay more often? Baykeeper is helping to find out, and you can help, too. We’re assisting the Oceanic Society with a new study to find out how many gray whales are coming to the Bay and what dangers they face. The public is encouraged to help by reporting...

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