Baykeeper Updates Related to Low Impact Development

BK In The News: November 23, 2017
... A luxury mega-marina proposal by local political powerhouse Darius Anderson, is a stunningly audacious asset grab... The SFUSD science department has spoken out against the plan, as have 23 fourth-grade teachers, the Sierra Club, Bay Keeper and the U.S. Sailing Association, the governing body...
Blog Post: June 9, 2011
At a Cupertino City Council meeting on Tuesday Steve Jobs presented his vision for a new Apple campus, where about 80% of the 150 acre site would be landscaped with permeable surfaces. He may not know it, but this is probably one of the largest low impact development (LID) projects in the Bay Area...
BK In The News: March 1, 2011
In Marin this rainy season, about three million gallons of raw sewage has spilled into the bay according to the watchdog group SF Baykeeper. Sewage spills, large and small, are common in Marin and storm water runoff is a persistent problem, carrying – unfiltered -- everything from heavy metals to...
Blog Post: January 11, 2011
If you're a resident of San Francisco, check out this special SFPUC program to help you reduce water consumption and storm water pollution to the Bay by installing a rainwater harvesting system. SFPUC is offering discounted rain barrels and cisterns for residents, businesses and schools, and for...
Blog Post: December 1, 2009
In October 2009 the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board adopted the final Municipal Regional Stormwater Permit, pursuant to the Clean Water Act. Also known as an MS4 permit, this document describes the requirements cities are required to follow in regards to stormwater and...
Monthly Column: January 1, 2009
While the rainy season in the Bay Area can mean an end to nice weather and much-loved outdoor activities, it’s an important and productive time for our environment – rain prompts new plant growth after many dry months and replenishes water reserves for drinking and irrigation. In urban areas...
Monthly Column: April 1, 2008
Bay Area storm drains tie into our creeks and empty into the Bay without any treatment or filtering. So when it rains, the cigarette butts, automotive fluids, pet waste, household gardening chemicals, and trash accumulated in gutters is washed into local creeks and the Bay. In fact, polluted...